Dec 102011
 
Panorama of Brisbane shoreline and pier

Panorama of Brisbane shoreline and pier

My work recently relocated further up north from Palo Alto to Brisbane. While this has increased the distance of my commute and taken my away from readily accessible places to dine and shopping centers, it has given me easy access to some stunningly beautiful scenery along the length of the commute as well as in the areas surrounding the offices where I work. The above image was stitched together from four horizontal shots made with the Sony A77 mounted on a panning ball head.

Sub ISO 100 Shooting

One of the biggest complaints people have made about the Sony Alpha A77 DSLR is that the camera produces images with more noise than normal. And that is true. For the given sensor density, noise is a fact of life, at least with the current level of technology. For these shots, since I was going to be doing long exposures anyways, I went for the sub ISO 100 settings of ISO 50 and ISO 80. The end result are images with very low levels of sensor noise, even when capturing exposures as long as 30 seconds long.

Brisbane Westward - Evening

Brisbane Westward - Evening

The above shot was stitched from 2 photographs shot wide to provide a good view of both sky and water. It isn’t as post processed as the wider panorama, but I’m okay with that for this version of the image.

Still learning the ins and outs of this camera. It is very different from the A700 that I had been shooting with before, and I’m sure that with newer firmware updates, there will be incremental improvement to image quality as well as increased proficiency, on my part. The location is also new to me. Understanding how the environment changes with the light, such as the fog rolling in and the rapid change of the skyline colors.

Definitely will be producing more photographs of the area.

Sensor Dust and SLT

One thing I noticed, when shooting stopped down apertures, was the presence of dust and hair. This kind of freaked me out since this was an SLT, but I was able to clear things up with an arctic butterfly and the camera’s vibration-based cleaning cycle.